Salvador Carlos Santiago

On January 15, 1985, a month after being released from prison for armed robbery, Salvador Santiago murdered 20-year old Dean K. O’Hara in New Castle (Lawrence County), Pennsylvania, after O’Hara stopped to help him with his disabled car.

image001
Pittsburgh Press, January 16, 1985

Santiago, 22, then stole O’Hara’s car and fled. Two days later, he robbed the Minuteman Press shop on East Carson St. on Pittsburgh’s South Side and shot to death store clerk Patrick Huber.

image001
Pittsburgh Press, January 18, 1985

Based on information provided by witnesses, on January 17, state police issued a warrant for Santiago’s arrest for killing O’Hara. Approximately three weeks later, based on descriptions matching witness reports from New Castle, Santiago was connected to Huber’s killing and the search intensified.

image001
Pittsburgh Press, March 2, 1985

He was arrested by FBI agents in Washington D.C. on April 4, 1985, for unlawful flight to avoid prosecution for O’Hara’s killing. Once questioned by Pittsburgh Police, Santiago confessed to killing Huber. He told police voices he heard directed him to perform the killings.

At the time of his arrest, Santiago, who already had a lengthy criminal record, was also wanted in connection with the non-fatal shooting of a bus station clerk during a robbery in Sharon, Pennsylvania, in early January 1985.

Soon after his arrest, his girlfriend, Marilyn Denise Giles, whom he had met in Washington, D.C. in February 1985, told police of the multiple murders Santiago had confessed to her.

At trial in Lawrence County, Santiago was found guilty of second-degree murder but mentally ill in the O’Hara case and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Despite that and his earlier diagnosis as “a seriously disturbed paranoid schizophrenic,” Santiago’s mental health defense failed and he was convicted of first-degree murder on April 26, 1986, in the Huber case. The jury favored the prosecution’s argument that “a conscience never formed” in Santiago.

image001
Pittsburgh Press, April 25, 1986

After brief deliberations following the penalty phase of Santiago’s trial, he was sentenced to death on April 28. The jury again rejected the defense claim that Santiago’s guilt was diminished by mental illness.

While Santiago’s life sentence was upheld on appeal (Commonwealth v. Santiago, 376 Pa. Super. 54, 1988), his first-degree murder conviction and death sentence were reversed (Commonwealth v. Santiago, 528 Pa. 516, 1991) after the Pennsylvania Supreme Court found that he had been questioned without the benefit of counsel when he spoke with Pittsburgh police soon after his arrest. A new trial was ordered.

Retried, he was convicted of first-degree murder on September 9, 1992, and sentenced to death a second time. That conviction was sustained on appeal by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court (Commonwealth v. Santiago, 541 Pa. 188, 1995).

After twenty-three years of appeals that reached all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and multiple stays of his execution, Santiago’s death sentence was vacated by the state supreme court and he was resentenced to life imprisonment on August 25, 2009. The decision was based on a finding of ineffective counsel in his second death penalty conviction. That conclusion was reached as part an agreement with his counsel that Santiago would cease all further appeals.

Salvador Santiago is serving a life sentence in SCI-Greene.

Author: Bill Lofquist

I am a sociologist and death penalty scholar at the State University of New York at Geneseo. I am also a Pittsburgh native. My present research focuses on the history of the death penalty in Allegheny County (Pittsburgh), Pa. This website is dedicated to collecting, analyzing, and sharing information about all Allegheny County cases in which a death sentence was imposed. Please share any questions or comments, errors or omissions, or other matters of interest related to these cases or to the broader history of the death penalty in Allegheny County.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s