Frank Green

In the waning days of World War I and the waning weeks of the busiest year of capital murders in Pittsburgh’s history, Alabama-born coal miner Frank Green killed Frank Vukovich during a robbery in East Pittsburgh. The killing occurred late on Saturday night, November 2, 1918, when Green and his friends, Jasper Fletcher and Herman Simpson, en route to Homestead, encountered Vukovich and two of his friends on Braddock Avenue.

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Under circumstances that are a matter of dispute, Green and his companions shot Vukovich, who died the next morning.

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At trial, Green claimed he acted in self-defense after Vukovich and his friends, all recent immigrant steelworkers, attacked him and his friends, also steelworkers, in a racially-motivated incident. Eyewitness testimony indicated that Green fired the fatal shots.

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 10, 1919

The state claimed the killing occurred as part of an armed robbery. In a highly charged racial atmosphere, Green was convicted on June 11, 1919, and sentenced to death on November 1.

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 12, 1919

Fletcher and Simpson, who maintained they were unaware of Green’s intent to rob and kill and were not in the immediate vicinity of the killing, were both convicted of voluntary manslaughter on June 18, 1919. They were sentenced to 12 years in Western Penitentiary.

Frank Green was executed on March 29, 1920.

The defendants lived in Port Perry, a no longer extant town on the Monongahela River near Braddock that was overtaken by the expansion of the steel industry.

Author: Bill Lofquist

I am a sociologist and death penalty scholar at the State University of New York at Geneseo. I am also a Pittsburgh native. My present research focuses on the history of the death penalty in Allegheny County (Pittsburgh), Pa. This website is dedicated to collecting, analyzing, and sharing information about all Allegheny County cases in which a death sentence was imposed. Please share any questions or comments, errors or omissions, or other matters of interest related to these cases or to the broader history of the death penalty in Allegheny County.

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